Category Archives: Military history

The Real Threats of Spanish Flu & Covid-19

Historically, the movement of people has always spread disease. We are taught as children about the Black Death that killed a one third of Europe’s population. Those initial introductions to the devastating impacts of epidemics leave lasting impressions upon us into our adulthoods. However, to what extent have the lessons from past pandemics remained in our public psyche? Continue reading

Posted in Covid-19 Pandemic, Medical History, Military history, war and peace, war and society, World War I | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

History Lessons Ignored: The Trump Administration and the Mobilization for World War II

Despite this evidence of a policy shift in the direction of a more World War II-style industrial mobilization, President Trump’s comments in mid-March suggested that today’s leaders remain ignorant, perhaps willfully so, of many relevant historical lessons. During the world wars, the Cold War, and even more recently, US leaders took it for granted that national authorities could and should use the available legal authority—including the National Defense Act of 1916, the First and Second War Powers Acts of 1941-42, and the DPA—to coordinate crash mobilization programs. Continue reading

Posted in Covid-19 Pandemic, Historians, Military history, Mobilization, War and memory, war and society, World War II | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

War Stories: The Mississippi National Guard’s 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team Deploys for Operation Iraqi Freedom

By Kevin Green, University of Southern Mississippi Note: This is the fourth in a series of posts about the National Guard and the Reserves. In January of 2005, The Mississippi National Guard’s 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team (155 ABCT) mobilized … Continue reading

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Honors and Officers: The Impact of the National Guard on African Americans in the 369th Infantry Regiment

By Douglas Bristol, University of Southern Mississippi A Surprising Military Parade On February 17, 1919, black soldiers of the 369th Infantry Regiment marched through the streets of New York City past cheering crowds.  The military parade was led by Lt. … Continue reading

Posted in African American soldiers, Military history, Military integration, National Guard, Officer Corps, war and society, World War I | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

“We Danced While They Bombed”: Popular Dancing in Britain during the Second World War

by Allison Abra, Ph.D. In the fall of 1939, during the first months of the Second World War, famed American war correspondent Edward R. Murrow undertook what he called an “investigation into London nightlife.” Describing a recent tour through some … Continue reading

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Why We Need to Study Soldiers and Families

In honor of today’s release of her latest book, Hood’s Texas Brigade: The Soldiers and Families of the Confederacy’s Most Celebrated Unit, Dale Center co-director Susannah Ural reflects on a new approach to writing unit histories. by Susannah J. Ural, … Continue reading

Posted in military families, Military history, soldiers, U.S. Civil War, unit histories, war and society | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The War Stories We Tell

by Heather Marie Stur, Ph.D. My Honors students and I recently watched the 1946 Oscar-winning film, The Best Years of Our Lives, which follows three World War II veterans as they return home and struggle to settle back into civilian … Continue reading

Posted in Military history, public history, soldiers, Vietnam War, war and society, World War II | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Recovering the Experiences of the Black Greatest Generation

by Douglas Bristol After conducting hundreds of hours of oral history interviews with Vietnam veterans, the Founding Director of the Dale Center, Dr. Andrew Wiest, persuasively argued in his Boys of ’67: Charlie Company’s War in Vietnam that historians have … Continue reading

Posted in African American soldiers, Black veterans, Civil Rights Movement, Military history, oral history, soldiers, U.S. military and civil rights, war and society, World War II | Tagged | Leave a comment

“A Firm and Perpetual League of Friendship and Amity?”: Reevaluating the United Colonies of New England and the Politics of War, 1636-1690

by Tyler Rotter, Guest Contributor As a self-proclaimed cultural historian, I began my dissertation research believing political history was passé, especially in relation to military history. I could not have been more wrong. When addressing the relationship between religion and … Continue reading

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From Small Things: How a Staff Ride Became Two Articles and a Book Project

by Ricardo A. Herrera, Guest Contributor While a historian on the Staff Ride Team, Combat Studies Institute, US Army Combined Arms Center, I spent much of the summer of 2008 researching and building a staff ride on the 1777 British … Continue reading

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